Turning Science into Action

Join Dr. Daniel Simberloff & Dr. Anthony Ricciardi in Kamloops. Register today! learn more »

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Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes learn more »

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

Invasive Species Research Conference

Turning Science into Action! Co-hosted by Thompson Rivers University and the Invasive Species Council of BC. learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Queen Anne’s Lace

Family Name
Carrot Family
Species
Daucus carota

Queen Anne's lace (Daucus carota) is an invasive biennial herb that smells like a carrot and grows 3-4' tall, blooming from May to October. This plant shows an umbrella-shaped flower cluster at the top of a central stem, with one or more additional hairy hollow stems. It's slender, woody taproot is carrot-like in smell and taste. 

A native of Europe and Asia, Queen Anne's lace invades disturbed dry agriculture land, abandoned fields, waste places, and road sides. It is a threat to recovering grasslands and can be persistent on clay soils. It tends to decline as native grasses and herbaceous plants become established. Queen Anne's lace is common in southwest BC, known from southeast Vancouver Island, the Gulf Island and adjacent mainland, and also from Vernon. 

Effective control methods include hand-pulling or mowing in mid to late summer before seed set.

Gallery: Queen Anne’s Lace