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Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

Invasive Species Research Conference

Turning Science into Action! Co-hosted by Thompson Rivers University and the Invasive Species Council of BC. learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Marsh Plume Thistle

Species
Cirsium Palustre

Marsh plume thistle (Cirsium palustre) is a biennial and considered regionally noxious under the BC Weed Control Act. The majority of sites are located in the central interior. Marsh plume thistle is actively contained and monitored at sites in coastal BC, near Revelstoke, and Vernon. Marsh Plume thistle is a noxious weed in the Bulkley-Nechako and Fraser-Ft. George Regional Districts.

Marsh plume thistle is distinguished from other thistles by its single, slender, un-branched stem with spiny wings. Purple flowers cluster at the end, with spiny, hairy leaves that have prominent woody veins on the underside. Plants grow up to 1.5 metres in height at maturity.

Preferring moist to wet, naturally open, or disturbed habitats, marsh plume thistle spreads through wind and water seed dispersal, as well as ingestion and deposit by birds. Plants replace native vegetation in open, undisturbed, natural areas including wet meadows, fields, and riparian areas; thereby reducing native species and threatening natural diversity. Additionally, they form dense clumps in cut blocks, competing for moisture and nutrients with tree seedlings planted for reforestation. Tall stems can lead to snow press, permanently damaging tree seedlings.

TIPS Factsheets

Gallery: Marsh Plume Thistle