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Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes learn more »

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

Invasive Species Research Conference

Turning Science into Action! Co-hosted by Thompson Rivers University and the Invasive Species Council of BC. learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Hound’s-Tongue

Species
Cynoglossum officinale

Hound’s-tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) is a biennial to short-lived perennial, and is considered noxious under the BC Weed Control Act. Hound’s-tongue is found on dry pasture, roadsides, and logged forestland. Found primarily in the southern interior of BC, it is a major concern in the Kootenay, Okanagan, Thompson, and Cariboo areas.

Mature hound’s tongue plants have a woody taproot, with rough, hairy, wide leaves and dull reddish-purple, five-petal flowers. Each flower produces four rounded-triangular seeds covered with hooked prickles. Growing 0.5-1.2 metres tall, stems leaves are short and stalkless. First year plants form a rosette with leaves hanging down to resemble the shape of a dog’s tongue.

Each plant produces 2,000-4,000 barbed seeds a year that cling easily clothing, livestock and wildlife, resulting in new infestations spread over great distances. Hound’s-tongue decreases forage production on rangeland and pastures. Barbed seeds that cling stubbornly to the hair, wool and fur of animals increase stress on animals and veterinary costs and decreasing market value.

Warning: Hound’s-tongue contains toxic alkaloids that can cause liver damage in cattle, deer, pigs, horses, and goats.

Refer to Weeds BC for information on prevention and control methods.

TIPS Factsheets

Gallery: Hounds Tongue