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Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes learn more »

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

What are invasive species?

The ISC defines the term “invasive species” as any non-native organism that cause economic or environmental harm and can spread quickly to new areas of BC. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which developed the list of the 100 world’s worst invasive species, defines them as “animals, plants or other organisms introduced by man into places out of their natural range of distribution, where they become established and disperse, generating a negative impact on the local ecosystem and species.”

What are Invasive Plants?

The ISC defines the term "invasive plant" as any invasive plant species that has the potential to pose undesirable or detrimental impacts on people, animals or ecosystems. Invasive plants can establish quickly and easily on both disturbed and un-disturbed sites, and causing widespread negative economic, social, and environmental impacts. Many invasive plants have been introduced to BC without their natural predators and pathogens that would otherwise keep their populations in check in their countries of origin. For this reason, invasive plants also commonly referred to as "alien", "non-native", "exotic" or "introduced" plant species.