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Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes learn more »

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

How are they introduced and spread?

Invasive species are introduced and spread in a variety of ways, including:

  • as goods such as plant products, firewood, hay, or wood packaging;
  • as live food imports;
  • as horticultural imports;
  • through vehicles such as aircraft, commercial and recreational boats;
  • ballast water from large ships; and
  • wildlife disease


Invasive plants are introduced and spread by: 

  • Improper disposal of garden plants. Please do not recycle garden debris into public parks or open areas such as ditches. Never compost. Instead, bag and incinerate at your local landfill.
  • Unintentional dispersal. Without their natural predators and pathogens, invasive plants spread quickly all on their own!
  • Intentionally as garden ornamentals. Please do not trade or purchase known invasive plants. To learn more, visit the section for Gardeners under You Can Help.