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Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes learn more »

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Webinar Archive

Welcome to ISCBC's Webinar Archive!

We hope you enjoy ISCBC's selection of recorded webinars. See below for PDFs of speakers' slide decks (where applicable) as well as links to view each recorded webinar. For scheduled webinars as they are offered, please click here.

Title: Innovate with NSERC Research Partnership Grants!

Date: Wednesday, June 7, 2017
Time: 12 pm - 1 pm PDT
Host: Pamela Giberson, Research and Innovation Development Officer, NSERC

Description: NSERC is Canada’s largest federal agency that supports research in the natural sciences and engineering, with an annual budget of $1.2 Billion. NSERC’s Research Partnership grants are specifically designed to bring companies and academic researchers together to solve the company’s technical challenges and create long-term collaborations. The main mechanism to initiate those collaborations is NSERC’s Engage Grant, which has supported over 7,500 projects worth approximately $185 Million. Also, the NSERC Experience Grant helps support the cost of undergraduate interns working at companies. Pam has a Master’s degree from UBC and a PhD from the University of Saskatchewan. She’s worked in academia, industry, and government and understands the unique aspects of each of those sectors.

Host Bio: Pam has been with the NSERC Pacific regional office in Vancouver since it opened in 2006. Her primary role at NSERC is to improve stakeholder awareness of NSERC’s Research Partnerships programs and facilitate research collaborations between companies and academics. Prior to joining NSERC Pam worked for a decade in the biotechnology sector in Vancouver in a variety of roles, including corporate development at a drug discovery company spun out of UBC, as a co-founder of a biotech company, and as a consultant to the local biotech sector. Pam obtained her PhD in Toxicology from the University of Saskatchewan in 1990 and followed that with postdoctoral training at the University of British Columbia.

Audiences: in addition to businesses and academic researchers in the field of invasive species we encourage government representatives and students to watch the webinar to learn how they can participate.

View the Innovate with NSERC Research Partnership Grants Webinar: WEBINAR |  PDF

Title: New Invasive Plant Species of Concern to BC’s Grasslands
Date
: Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Time: 12 pm - 1 pm PDT

Host: Becky Brown, BC Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations

Description: Invasive plants can threaten our natural resources, infrastructure, and the health of people, animals and our environment. We have an opportunity to avoid these risks from plants that are new or not yet present in the province. The provincial Early Detection Rapid Response (EDRR) Program seeks to identify, contain and eradicate new invasive species early before this opportunity is lost. This talk will focus on several new invasive plant species that pose significant threats to BC’s grasslands, including how to identify and report them and the most likely places they will occur.

Audience: We encourage anyone involved or interested in invasive species management to participate—everyone is welcome! This webinar will be of interest to anyone involved in invasive plant management but of particular interest to range managers, backcountry horse enthusiasts and grassland conservationists.

Host Bio: Becky is an Invasive Plant Specialist with the BC Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations and Coordinator of the provincial Early Detection Rapid Response Program for invasive plants. She’s been working in natural resource management for the past 20 years and currently works closely with all levels of governments and other land managers to mitigate the impacts of new species to the province.

View the New Invaders to BC Grassland Webinar: WEBINAR |  PDF

Title: Tackling Aquatic Invasive Parrot's Feather in British Columbia
Presenter: Taryn Hesketh, Environmental Coordinator, City of Richmond
Date: Wednesday April 19th, 2017; 12 pm - 1 pm PDT

Description: Parrot’s Feather is an aquatic invasive plant likely introduced to Richmond’s waterways by the act of dumping an unwanted aquarium. This presentation will provide an overview of this species identification, how it spreads and the issues it has posed for Richmond’s waterways. Also, this presentation will discuss successes and challenges of applied trials in an effort to control this invasive species and best management practices the City has implemented for their operations crews working within and around Parrot’s Feather.
Bio: Davon is a Postdoctoral fellow at Fisheries and Oceans’ Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo, BC. She works closely with the BC Ministry of Environment and is developing new environmental DNA technologies for invasive species detection and biosurveillance of freshwater fish communities in BC. 

Bio: Taryn holds a degree in Environmental Geography and has experience in riparian restoration, invasive species and integrated pest management. She currently works for the City of Richmond managing the City’s Enhanced Pesticide Management Program and the Invasive Species Action Plan.

View the Parrot's Feather Webinar using these links: WEBINAR |  PDF 

Dr. Davon Callander
Postdoctoral Fellow at Fisheries & Oceans Canada Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo BC

Title: eDNA metabarcoding for invasive fish detection in British Columbia
Date: Wednesday Mar 29, 2017; 12 pm - 1 pm PDT
Description: Aquatic invasive species (AIS) are a major threat to freshwater aquatic ecosystems and fisheries in BC. Invasive fish may out-compete native species for food or prey upon native juvenile fish. Early detection of invaders maximizes the chance for effective management intervention towards preventing or mitigating their potentially harmful impacts. Environmental DNA (eDNA) can be used to detect species in a water body and is ideally suited for rare, endangered, or invasive species. eDNA metabarcoding can also provide biodiversity information about the entire fish community. Genomic-based survey methods are more sensitive, cost-effective, and are non-invasive compared to traditional survey methods. An eDNA metabarcoding tool for detection of invasive fish and biodiversity monitoring in BC lakes is being developed and field-based testing is ongoing in BC lakes with known fish assemblages. We are testing several factors associated with sample collection (water volume, filtration method, spatial location, intensity of sampling, collection depth, seasonal detection probability) to develop the best approach to eDNA metabarcoding fish detection in BC lakes. This tool will enable more effective monitoring and management of high risk invasive fish species in BC.
Bio: Davon is a Postdoctoral fellow at Fisheries and Oceans’ Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo, BC. She works closely with the BC Ministry of Environment and is developing new environmental DNA technologies for invasive species detection and biosurveillance of freshwater fish communities in BC. 

Related Resources: Click here to download the paper by researchers using the larger 50 litre sampling technique discussed in this webinar.

View the eDNA webinar using these links: WEBINAR |  PDF 

Jeff Adams
Marine Ecologist at Washington Sea Grant, part of the University of Washington’s College of the Environment.

Title: Eyes on the Beach and Boots on the Mud - European Green Crab Monitoring on our Coastline 
Date: Wednesday Jan 25, 2017; 12 pm - 1 pm PST
Description: The globally invasive European green crab has been on the Salish Sea’s doorstep for two decades now, but none were captured from inland marine waters until 2012, renewing concerns about potential impacts and renewing interest in monitoring. The Washington Sea Grant Crab Team was formed with support from the US Environmental Protection Agency and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to create and sustain a volunteer monitoring network to maximize the likelihood of detecting green crab while populations are manageable. In this webinar we’ll briefly discuss the green crab, talk about Washington's early detection and rapid response efforts, and explore future monitoring and collaboration to prevent, identify, and reduce the threat of European green crab to the Salish Sea and beyond.
Bio: Jeff is a Marine Ecologist at Washington Sea Grant, part of the University of Washington’s College of the Environment. Jeff supports beach naturalist, watershed stewardship, and invasive species programs throughout Puget Sound as well as associated citizen science opportunities. He is passionate about sharing the wonders of watery worlds with all who will listen. Current projects include monitoring pocket estuaries for native and invasive crabs; working with Shore Friendly Kitsap colleagues, volunteers, and shoreline homeowners to consider alternatives to bulkheads; monitoring shoreline restoration projects, and collaborating with WSU colleagues to implement Watershed Stewardship Programs. In his off time, Jeff enjoys island life with his wife and two budding beach naturalists.

View the Green Crab webinar using these links: WEBINAR |  PDF 

Purnima Govindarajulu
Small Mammal and Herpetofauna Conservation Specialist for the Ministry of Environment in Victoria BC. 

Title: The Complexities of Invasive Species Management: Case Study of Bullfrog Populations in BC
Date: Wednesday, Nov 23rd, 2016 from 12 pm - 1 pm PST 
Description: Invasive species are considered one the major threats to biodiversity globally. They may impact native biodiversity through direct or indirect food web effects including competition and predation or through habitat displacement. Given this, wildlife managers would like to eradicate invasive species and promote the conservation and recovery of native species. Given unlimited resources, this is a simple goal. However, within the constraints of funding and logistics, the issue of invasive species management quickly becomes complicated. This talk will explore the impacts of bullfrogs on native frogs on Vancouver Island, cost-effectiveness from pilot bullfrog control and eradication projects, and potential long term management strategies. 
Bio: Purnima Govindarajulu is the Small Mammal and Herpetofauna Conservation Specialist for the Ministry of Environment in Victoria BC. She obtained both her B.Sc. (hons.) and M.Sc. from McGill University, and her Ph.D. from University of Victoria. Her Ph.D. research examined the impact of introduced bullfrogs on native frogs and her post-doctoral work documented the prevalence of an emerging global amphibian pathogen (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) in British Columbia. In her current position, she implements applied research projects addressing conservation and population recovery needs of frogs, snakes, turtles and bats and management of introduced herpetofauna and emerging diseases. These research projects are collaboratively implemented with independent researchers in the non-governmental organizations and with faculty and graduate students at various BC Universities. She is also involved in stewardship and outreach through BC Frogwatch and the “Got Bats?” BC Community Bat Project. As a volunteer she coordinates the Urban Biodiversity Enhancement and Restoration Project at Haliburton Community Organic Farm, building wetlands and trying to improve urban biodiversity retention, enhancement, and connectivity.

View the bullfrog webinar using these links: WEBINAR |  PDF 

Please scroll down to view additional archived public webinars.

Webinars for PlantWise and Clean Drain Dry Programs: 

PLANTWISE PROGRAM WEBINARS: 

  1. 2015 PlantWise Webinar (half hour)
    Hosted by Evan Rafuse, PlantWise Program Coordinator (ISCBC), this webinar is required training for all PlantWise Ambassadors, and is also a great tool for the general public. It provides an overview of the PlantWise and Grow Me Instead programs. This webinar is meant to help you become "PlantWise" and be empowered to help stop the introduction and spread of horticulturally invasive plants impacting our communities and beyond our borders.  
     
  2. 2015 Grow Me Instead Webinar (half hour)
    Hosted by Evan Rafuse, PlantWise Program Coordinator (ISCBC), this webinar is required training for all PlantWise Ambassadors, and is also a great resource for the general public. It provides a detailed account of the Grow Me Instead program and resources. Grow Me Instead is a tool for gardeners and the general public that outlines 26 of BC's most "unwanted" invasive plants that are commonly purchased, sold and traded among gardeners. This webinar will help you choose equally beautiful, non-invasive alternative plants for all growing regions across BC.
     
  3. 2015 PlantWise Ambassador Training Webinar (half hour) 
    Hosted by Evan Rafuse, PlantWise Program Coordinator (ISCBC), this webinar is required training for all PlantWise Ambassadors, and is not intended for the general public—but this is open to all who wish to view it! It provides a detailed overview of the PlantWise Ambassador program that covers additional topics that builds upon the 2015 PlantWise Webinar.
     
  4. 2015 PlantWise Ambassador Training: Industry Partner Program
    Hosted by Danielle Toperczer, PlantWise Program Manager (ISCBC), this webinar is required training for PlantWise Ambassadors and their staff, and is intended to provide key information and messaging to assist partners in successfully delivering the industry program. Thank you to the Investment Agriculture Foundation for supporting the PlantWise Industry initiative.

CLEAN DRAIN DRY PROGRAM WEBINARS: 

Clean Drain Dry webinars are narrated presentations designed for Clean Drain Dry Ambassadors; however, they are open to anyone that wants to learn more about aquatic invasive species and the Clean Drain Dry program:

Introduction to Clean Drain Dry Webinar 2015 (half hour)
Hosted by Sue Staniforth, Aquatics Manager (ISCBC), this webinar is required training for all Clean Drain Dry Ambassadors, but is also a great tool for the general public. The webinar explores some of the issues and impacts of aquatic invasive species and how people can get involved in their prevention and management. It then reviews the Clean Drain Dry program, its evolution, successes, and processes, and its basis in community-based social marketing theory.

Clean Drain Dry Ambassador Program 2015 (half hour)
Hosted by Sue Staniforth, Aquatics Manager (ISCBC), this webinar is required training for all Clean Drain Dry Ambassadors. While it is not designed for the general public, anyone is welcome to view it. The webinar provides a detailed overview of the Ambassador program, and the roles and deliverables required to become a CDD Ambassador. You can also get more information about how to protect our waterways from invasive species from our Clean Drain Dry program webpage.

CLEAN DRAIN DRY & PLANTWISE PROGRAM WEBINAR:

Fostering Positive Behaviours Through Community-Based Social Marketing Webinar 2015 (1 hour)
Hosted by Ken Donnelly, Beyond Attitude Consulting, this webinar discusses Community-Based Social Marketing principles as they apply to messaging of the PlantWise and Clean Drain Dry programs. This webinar is intended for Clean Drain Dry and PlantWise Ambassadors, and is open to the general public.

Becky Brown, P.Ag.  
Invasive Plant Specialist - Provincial Early Detection Rapid Response Coordinator, B.C. Ministry of Forests, Lands & Natural Resource Operations (MFLNRO)

Title: B.C. Invasive Plant Early Detection Rapid Response: Boot Camp Without the Sweat (slender false brome, flowering rush shiny geranium)
Date: Wednesday June 29th, 2016 from NOON - 1PM PST 
Description: Find out how to become involved in the BC Invasive Species Early Detection Rapid Response Program by learning how to identify and report three important candidate species for eradication. Find out where these species are located, why they are problematic, what is being done about them and how you can help!
Bio: Becky Brown is a Professional Agrologist and an Invasive Plant Specialist (MFLNRO). She has a B.Sc. in Environmental Science from Royal Roads University and a Technical Diploma in Environmental Planning from Selkirk College. Becky has been working in BC’s natural resource industry in the public, private and non-profit sectors since 1996 and draws on a broad range of experience in land use planning, management and environmental science to support development and implementation of the new BC Early Detection Rapid Response Program for invasive plants. She first started working with invasive plants in 2003 with the BC Ministry of Forests, and has since had the opportunity and pleasure of working with land managers and other stakeholders throughout BC and bordering jurisdictions. Becky is excited that the province is moving towards a more strategic approach to managing invasive species and looks forward to more changes ahead.

View the webinar using these links: PDF | WEBINAR

Cindy Sawchuk 
Senior Integration Advisor, Alberta Provincial Government, AIS Watercraft Inspections and Conservation K-9 program lead 

Title: Mussels and Mutts: The Alberta Conservation Canine Program 
Date: Wednesday June 8th, 2016 from NOON - 1PM PST 
Description: Alberta (like BC) is one of the few jurisdictions left in North America that is free of invasive Dreissenid mussels. The cost of an infestation in Alberta is estimated to be $75 million annually. As such, the Alberta provincial government is working to keep zebra and quagga mussels out through an Aquatic Invasive Species prevention program. Given the importance of prevention, it is imperative to incorporate tools that are effective. In 2014, the Government of Alberta partnered with irrigation stakeholders and the Montana Department of Natural Resources to pilot the use of detection dogs to detect invasive mussels on watercraft. Working Dogs for Conservation was contracted to train their canines to inspect watercraft on either side of the border in a ten day pilot. As part of this pilot a comparison trial was also conducted to compare the accuracy and efficiency of trained watercraft inspectors versus trained canines. The overwhelming success of this pilot led to the creation of the Alberta Conservation Canine Program – an innovative approach to prevent an introduction of invasive mussels. Alberta is the first jurisdiction in Canada to employ full time detection dogs at mandatory watercraft inspection stations throughout the province.
Bio: Cindy Sawchuk has been with Alberta Environment and Parks for 8 years, and is the lead for the AIS Watercraft Inspections and Conservation K-9 programs.  She is currently based in Canmore where she works with her detection dog Hilo, inspecting boats around the province for invasive mussels.

View the webinar using these links: PDF | WEBINAR

Becky Brown, P.Ag.
Invasive Plant Specialist - Provincial Early Detection Rapid Response Coordinator, B.C. Ministry of Forests, Lands & Natural Resource Operations (MFLNRO)

Title: BC Aquatic Invasive Plants: The What, Where and How
Date: Wednesday May 25, 2016 from NOON - 1PM PST
Description: A snapshot of the top aquatic invasive plants in BC, such as water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes), flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus) and Brazilian elodea (Egeria densa). What are they, where are they, what are we doing about them and how can you help? The presentation also discusses yellow floating heart (Nymphoides peltata), water hyacinth, (Eichhornia crassipes), garden yellow loosestrife (Lysimachia vulgaris), parrot’s feather (Myriophyllum aquaticum), fragrant waterlily (Nymphaea odorata) and more.
Bio: Becky Brown is a Professional Agrologist and an Invasive Plant Specialist (MFLNRO). She has a B.Sc. in Environmental Science from Royal Roads University and a Technical Diploma in Environmental Planning from Selkirk College. Becky has been working in BC’s natural resource industry in the public, private and non-profit sectors since 1996 and draws on a broad range of experience in land use planning, management and environmental science to support development and implementation of the new BC Early Detection Rapid Response Program for invasive plants. She first started working with invasive plants in 2003 with the BC Ministry of Forests, and has since had the opportunity and pleasure of working with land managers and other stakeholders throughout BC and bordering jurisdictions. Becky is excited that the province is moving towards a more strategic approach to managing invasive species and looks forward to more changes ahead.

View the webinar using these links: PDF | WEBINAR

Laura Kristiansen
Invasive Species Database & Spatial Data Analyst, Ministry of Forests, Lands & Natural Resource Operations (MFLNRO)

Title: Advanced IAPP for Supervisors - Best Practices for Batch Uploading and Field Form Apps
Date: Wednesday May 4, 2016 from NOON - 1PM PST
Description: This advanced IAPP webinar highlights two new tools released last year: 1) the iPad IAPP Field Forms app, which enhances the accuracy of data gathering and ensures compatibility with IAPP data entry; and 2) the IAPP Batch Loader, which greatly reduces the time needed to accurately enter large amounts of survey and treatment field data into the IAPP database. Laura highlights the features of the Field Forms app (soon also available for Android), and the advantages of using the app for gathering survey and treatment data in the field. Laura also discusses using the Batch Loader schema files that the loader requires, provides a demonstration on the preparation of electronically gathered data (including but not limited to the IAPP Field Form app) and uploading them to IAPP.  An additional and exciting new feature of the Batch Loader to be released soon is the ability to upload images to sites and treatments using the schemas! 
Please note: prior knowledge on the use of IAPP is required for proper and confident use of the Batch Loader. Due to the possibility of large scale data errors by inexperienced users, it is strongly recommended that staff untrained on the IAPP data entry interface do not use the Batch Loader tool. Basic information about IAPP is not included in this webinar, but a standard one-day IAPP training seminar can be scheduled with Laura / MFLNRO. 
Bio: A TRU graduate computer programmer and FLNRO Data Analyst, Laura has been involved with the Invasive Alien Plant Program since its inception in 2004. She has had significant hands-on involvement in the numerous enhancements to the program over the years, as well as playing a key role in the development and launch of the successful Report-a-Weed and Report Invasives BC apps. She is the proud mother of two adult sons living in Vancouver, one of whom is a games programmer at Relic Entertainment, while the other is an accomplished graphic designer currently studying at Emily Carr University. Geek speak is the family’s second language.

View the webinar using this link: WEBINAR

Tracy Hueppelsheuser
Provincial Entomologist, BC Ministry of Agriculture

Title: Invasive Species in BC Agriculture 
Date: Wednesday April 20th, 2016 - Noon - 1pm PST
Description: Invasive species significantly impact BC agriculture. As speed and frequency of travel of goods and people increases globally, the risk of new pest introductions also increases. Many tools are employed including regulation (prevention and interception), monitoring and surveys, and implementation of eradication, containment, and management. We all play a role in preventing, detecting, and containment of any new invasive organisms that venture into BC.
Bio: Tracy Hueppelsheuser is a provincial entomologist for the British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture, based in Abbotsford. Her work focuses on biology and pest management of established and invasive insect species that impact BC agriculture. This includes insect identification, outreach and extension activities, policy and regulation development, and some surveillance. The Ministry works closely with other organizations with similar mandates and goals, including the federal agencies (Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Pest Management Regulatory Agency, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada), other provincial Ministries, local governments, and industry and grower organizations.

View the webinar using these links: PDF (4.5MB) | WEBINAR

Danielle Toperczer
Program Manager, Invasive Species Council of BC
Title: Be PlantWise: Tools to encourage BC gardeners and businesses to choose non-invasive plants
Date: Wednesday, November 25th, 2015 NOON - 1pm PST 
Description: In this webinar, Danielle will provide an in-depth look at the provincial PlantWise program that encourages BC gardeners to 'know what you grow,' and choose non-invasive plants, and retailers, growers and landscapers to sell and promote only safe, non-invasive plants. More and more members of the horticulture industry are leading by example and committing to stop selling invasive species and promote responsible alternatives. A new mobile app and website is being launched to help make British Columbians more Plantwise. The mobile app and website provides information about 26 of BC's most unwanted horticulture invaders with expert-suggested alternatives for all growing zones, and links consumers to local PlantWise Partners (retailers) who have committed to be invasive-free. During this webinar, learn more about the PlantWise program, the mobile app and website, and how you can be 'PlantWise' and/or a PlantWise Partner.
Bio: Danielle Toperczer is a Professional Agrologist who has worked with the Council since 2010. She manages large ISCBC projects as well as fund development. Her past work experience includes fisheries surveys, range management and not-for-profit work.

View the webinar using these links: PDF (2 MB) | WEBINAR

Andrew Suarez 
University of Illinois, Department of Animal Biology & Department of Entomology
Title: "Invasive Ants: Behavioural Approaches to the Study of Invasions"
Date: 
Wednedsay Oct. 21, 2015, Noon - 1pm PST
Description: Andrew Suarez will discuss the behavioural approaches to his research, which suggests Argentine ants and fire ants are able to monopolize plant-based resources in introduced populations while being more predatory in their native ranges. Changes in trophic biology may allow introduced ant populations to attain higher worker densities relative to their native range where they co-exist with other ants in species rich communities. To examine the role of opportunity in invasion, Andrew's research team is developing a database of ants intercepted in quarantine in the U.S., with data to be used to examine why some species succeed as invaders while others do not. 
Bio: Andrew Suarez (www.life.illinois.edu/suarez) received his PhD from the University of California, San Diego in 2000. He was a Miller Research Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley and joined the University of Illinois’ faculty in 2003. He is now a Professor in the Departments of Entomology and Animal Biology. His research program capitalizes on the developmental and ecological flexibility of ants to investigate how polymorphism and specialization within complex societies contribute to their ecological success. Recent research in his lab includes the biomechanics of mandibles in trap-jaw ants, and using invasive species to understand the ecological consequences of global trade.

View the webinar using these links: PDF (6.9MB) | WEBINAR

Dr. Sam Chan
Aquatic Invasive Species Specialist, Oregon Sea Grant, Oregon State University
Title: Key Aquatic Invasive Plants in the Pacific Northwest and Don’t Let It Loose - Aquarium Invasives on the Move!
Date: Thurdsay Oct. 15th, 2015 Noon - 1pm PST 
Description: Dr. Sam Chan will provide a session on several key aquatic invasive plants to be aware of and on the lookout for in British Columbia. Areas covered include life history, ID tips and current distribution, as well as information about the Don't Let it Loose program that is geared toward aquarium and pet owners and retailers.
Bio: Dr. Sam Chan is Oregon Sea Grant's expert in aquatic invasive species and aquatic ecosystem health. His research focuses on drivers to water sustainability and novel invasive pathways that range from elucidating the risks and drivers of releases from schools to, biomass culture to  natural disaster driven pathways such as the 2011 Japan tsunami. He also provides public education and engagement to west coast stakeholder of all ages on identifying, controlling and managing the spread of marine invasives, and conducts research to test evaluate and implement invasive species educational programs. He also serves on the Oregon Invasive Species Council, and is its vice-chair. Sam is leading a new research project to evaluate the "Don't Pack a Pest" campaign aimed at reducing the risks of invasive species brought in by international travel. He is a co-PI building consensus between western states on consistent ways to reduce the risks of watercraft as vectors for invasive species. He is completing a three-year, NOAA-funded regional research and outreach project to combat aquatic invasive species on the West Coast.

View the webinar using these links: WEBINAR | PDF (3 MB)

Dr. Farrah Chan
Canadian Government Laboratory Visiting Fellow, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Date: September 16, 2015 Noon - 1pm PST 
Title: Reducing the risk of aquatic invasive species introductions and spread through vector management
Description: This webinar will provide an overview of the species invasion process and a review of various means (i.e. vectors) by which aquatic invasive species are introduced into new environments. Using ships’ ballast water as a case study, the seminar will demonstrate how risk assessment and vector management strategies may reduce the risk of introducing and spreading aquatic invasive species in Canada’s freshwater and coastal ecosystems.
Bio: Farrah Chan is a post-doctoral visiting fellow with Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Bayfield Institute. She is involved in the assessment of invasion risk associated with ballast water and exterior surfaces of ships in the Arctic, the Great Lakes, and the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of Canada. Her research interests include vectors and pathways of species introduction, risk assessment, determinants of invasion success, climate change, and invasions in the Arctic.

 

View the webinar using these links: PDF (5.6MB) | WEBINAR

Dr. Catherine Tarasoff 
Thompson Rivers University / Agrowest Consulting
Date: Wednesday July 29, 2015 Noon—1PM PST
Title: Every weed has an Achilles Heel - Using plant biology to control invasive species
Description: Yellow flag iris is an aggressive ornamental water garden plant that is spreading rapidly, out-competing native plant species and altering aquatic ecosystems across the Pacific Northwest. In this webinar, Dr. Tarasoff will share her research that focuses on yellow flag iris, and why understanding plant biology is an important consideration for methods of control.
Bio: Dr. Catherine Tarasoff (PhD., P.Ag) received her PhD from Oregon State University (2007) with a specialization in Weed Science and Range Ecology. Since graduating, she has held faculty positions at Michigan Technological University and Thompson Rivers University. Dr. Tarasoff strongly believes that every species has an Achilles Heel and successful weed control is achievable when we commit to developing a thorough understanding of each plant's unique biology.

View the webinar using these links: PDF (1.5MB) | WEBINAR

Dominique Sigg
Wildlife Conservation Specialist, BC Ministry of Environment
Date: Wednesday, June 24th, 2015 Noon – 1 PM
Title: Invasive Animals in BC: a Tale of Outdoor Play and a Love of Shakespeare
Description: This webinar explores the connections between invasive animals and outdoor recreation, and how our love for outdoor activities (and Shakespeare!) has led to many introductions in BC. Dominique will also discuss how invasive animals impact our recreation experiences, and what we can do to prevent their spread as we play in the outdoors.
Bio: Dominique is a Wildlife Conservation Specialist with the BC Ministry of Environment, where she has worked since moving to Canada in 2007. Dominique is involved in the management of invasive species (critters mostly) as well as the conservation of species at risk. In her previous life in Australia and New Zealand, she studied (BSc, PhD) and worked in the field of conservation biology, mostly on animals that have suffered significant impacts as a result of invasive species introductions.

View the webinar using these links: PDF (5MB) | WEBINAR

Dr. Robert Higgins
Biological Sciences Researcher, Thompson Rivers University
Date: Tuesday Nov. 4, 2014 at 1pm PST
Title: Invasive Ants of Canada: an Emerging Issue
Description: Until recently Canada has been fortunate in not experiencing the ecological, agricultural and urban trauma that has been occurring globally from invasive species of ants. The appearance of the European fire ant (Myrmica rubra) in both eastern and western Canada, though, may be announcing an approaching storm. This ant has quietly established without notice and is now affecting a diversity of mostly urban habitats such as residential areas, botanical gardens, community gardens, urban parks, and commercial landscaping operations. It significantly impacts local invertebrate fauna but is best known for its ability to displace people through its aggressive behaviour and painful sting. Canada has not experienced this type of a landscape level urban insect invasion previously. Further, this ant appears to be at the vanguard as other invasive ants are beginning to appear, one of which is actually causing sudden and unexpected runway closures at Vancouver International Airport. In this presentation we will look at this emerging issue and explore early efforts at control.
Bio: Rob Higgins is an entomologist with Thompson Rivers University who has been active in extending our knowledge of overall ant biodiversity in British Columbia. In the fall of 2010 Rob confirmed the presence of the European fire ant (Myrmica rubra) in the province. Following this he has been working with the province to both map the distribution of this invasive ant and to help develop control techniques. In addition, Rob has confirmed the appearance of the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) in Victoria, a major global invasive species that has spread through southern California. Through 2013, Rob was working on improving the ability of entomologists to distinguish the European fire ant from related species, a surprising challenge. This work led to the discovery of another European invasive ant, Myrmica specioides, now known as the impressive fire ant, that appears to be spreading broadly in southwestern BC.

View the webinar using these links: PDF (4MB) | WEBINAR

Dr. Sam Chan
Aquatic Invasive Species Specialist, Oregon Sea Grant, Oregon State University 
Date: Friday, Aug. 22, 2014 
Title: Key Aquatic Invasive Plants in the Pacific Northwest
Description: Dr. Sam Chan provided a session on several key aquatic invasive plants (emergent and submergent) to be aware of and on the lookout for in British Columbia. Areas covered include life history, ID tips and current distribution.

Bio: Dr. Sam Chan is Oregon Sea Grant's expert in aquatic invasive species and aquatic ecosystem health. His research focuses on drivers to water sustainability and novel invasive pathways that range from elucidating the risks and drivers of releases from schools to, biomass culture to  natural disaster driven pathways such as the 2011 Japan tsunami. He also provides public education and engagement to west coast stakeholder of all ages on identifying, controlling and managing the spread of marine invasives, and conducts research to test evaluate and implement invasive species educational programs. He also serves on the Oregon Invasive Species Council, and is its vice-chair. Sam is leading a new research project to evaluate the "Don't Pack a Pest" campaign aimed at reducing the risks of invasive species brought in by international travel. He is a co-PI building consensus between western states on consistent ways to reduce the risks of watercraft as vectors for invasive species. He is completing a three-year, NOAA-funded regional research and outreach project to combat aquatic invasive species on the West Coast.

View the webinar using these links: PDF (8MB) | WEBINAR 
(Note: There were technical difficulties with this recording; the sound cuts in and out during the second half of the recording. We apologise for the inconvenience).

Dr. Sam Chan
Aquatic Invasive Species Specialist, Oregon Sea Grant, Oregon State University 
Date: May 20, 2014
Title: Learning “British Columbia’s Top Aquatic Plant Invaders” to Protect Investments in Natural Resources and the Restoration
Bio: Sam Chan is Oregon Sea Grant's expert in aquatic invasive species and aquatic ecosystem health. He provides public education and engagement to Oregonians of all ages on identifying, controlling and managing the spread of marine invasives, and conducts research to test evaluate and implement invasive species educational programs. He also serves on the Oregon Invasive Species Council, and is its past chair. Sam has additional expertise in the areas of water quality and oil spill response and mitigation. 

View the webinar using these links: PDF (10MB) | WEBINAR 

Matthias Herborg 
Aquatic Invasive Species Specialist, BC Ministry of Environment
Date: June 13, 2014
Title: Quagga and Zebra Mussel Early Detection and Rapid Response Plan for British Columbia
Description: This webinar provides an in-depth look at the invasive zebra and quagga mussels through the overview of the Quagga and Zebra Mussel Early Detection Rapid Response Plan for British Columbia. 
Bio: Matthias Herborg did his PhD on the ecology of the invasive Chinese mitten Crab in Europe and then moved to Canada to work on Aquatic Invasive Species in the freshwater (Great Lakes) and marine (Nanaimo, BC). During his time with DFO at the Pacific Biological Station he worked on risk assessments on a number of aquatic invasive species, including perch, northern pike, walleye, large and smallmouth bass for BC. In his current position as the Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator for BC’s Ministry of Environment, Matthais is working on expanding the aquatic invasive species program. Currently a major focus is to implement the Controlled Alien Species Regulations. He is also involved in a couple of applied research projects looking at the impacts and improved management of aquatic invasive species in BC.

View the webinar using these links: PDF (5MB) | WEBINAR

Sue Staniforth
Education & Outreach, Invasive Species Council of BC
Title: Invasive Species Education: Many Audiences and Approaches Key to Success
Presented for Green Teacher magazine; now available FREE through ISCBC!
Description: Sue reviews a variety of educational strategies and fieldwork planning tools that support students and youth groups in tackling invasive species in their communities. She also highlights some activities that engage students in identifying, surveying and mapping native and invasive species, investigating the impacts of invasive species on local ecosystems, economy, and cultures, and developing effective action projects.
Bio: Sue Staniforth (BSc., MSc) is the Education and Outreach Manager for the Invasive Species Council of BC. Sue brings to her work over 25 years of experience as a biologist, educator and curriculum developer. She has developed over a dozen learning resources on topics that range from Garry Oak ecosystems to invasive species, and delivered hundreds of professional development workshops both provincially and nationally. Sue also has broad experience working with many stewardship groups, non-profits, communities and First Nations at local, regional, provincial and national levels. She is an avid gardener and hiker, and enjoys taking care of a heritage apple orchard and a menagerie of pets in her off-work hours.

 

View the webinar using this link: WEBINAR - UTUBE