Enter throughout May!

Taking part is simple. Cash prizes are up for grabs. learn more »

Take Action

May is BC Invasive Species Action Month! learn more »

100 Positive Actions in 1 Day

Take action in Williams Lake! learn more »

Webinar Recording

Calling all gardeners - watch the Bringing Back the Natives Garden Tour webinar.recording learn more »

June 27 Webinar

e-Learning for Realtors and Landscape Architects learn more »

Courses across BC March - May 2018

Read more and register today. learn more »

Watch the recording

Learn about the potential economic impacts of a new BC invasion learn more »

Watch the recording!

Presented by Dr. Jon Bossenbroek, University of Toledo. learn more »

Click here to learn more »

Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes learn more »

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Weed of the Week: Blueweed

From a gardener’s perspective, flowering plants that attract bees, butterflies, and birds while deterring deer from a daily nibble are a welcome addition to the yard. One such plant, blueweed (Echium vulgare), has pretty blue blossoms and makes for an attractive centerpiece in any garden bed, but comes with a surprising price tag to our ecosystems and economy as a highly invasive plant.

Invasive plants grow rapidly and spread quickly, causing damage to the environment, economy and our health. They are also the second greatest threat to biodiversity after habitat loss, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Introduced from Europe, blueweed is a biennial to short-lived perennial, and considered regionally noxious under the BC Weed Control Act. Blueweed is commonly found on roadsides, drainage ditches, rights-of-way, fence lines, pastures, rangeland, and other disturbed areas. It is a concern in the Cariboo, Central Kootenay, Columbia-Shuswap, East Kootenay, Okanagan-Silmilkameen, and Thompson-Nicola Regional Districts.

Commonly called “viper’s bugloss” because of its resemblance to a viper’s head, blueweed has bright blue blossoms found on the upper side of short, rough stems, and grows 30-80 centimetres in height. Hairy stems are painful to the touch, and hairs often have swollen dark bases that form noticeable flecks. Leaves become progressively smaller as they approach the top of the plant.

Although large infestations make a pretty photograph, this plant can spread quickly by producing healthy seeds that are easily distributed. A single plant can produce up to 2800 seeds that generally drop in the immediate vicinity of the parent plant, but can be distributed further by people and animals as the rough seeds stick to clothing, hair and feathers. Blueweed is occasionally found in nurseries as a gardening plant since it attracts butterflies and not deer or rabbits. Deer, as well as most grazing animals on pastures and rangelands, will avoid blueweed since it is unpalatable; therefore, a small infestation will spread quickly, reducing the area available for food and forage crops and increasing overgrazing on pastures. As a result, infestations are associated with economic losses and rising management costs on agricultural lands.

Help your community protect local resources by preventing and managing invasive plants. There are hundreds of beautiful native plants and non-invasive exotic alternatives available to replace this invasive in your backyard.

Article (Microsoft Word 32 kb)