April 25 Webinar

Register today! learn more »

Take Action

May is BC Invasive Species Action Month! learn more »

100 positive actions in 1 day

Take action in Williams Lake! learn more »

June 27 Webinar

e-Learning for Realtors and Landscape Architects learn more »

Courses across BC March - May 2018

Read more and register today. learn more »

Watch the recording!

Presented by Dr. Jon Bossenbroek, University of Toledo. learn more »

Click here to learn more »

Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes learn more »

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Putting invasive species to good use

Campbell River Mirror, Nov. 13, 2015: The Invasive Species Council calls it “a serious, smothering invasive” in southwestern B.C. Now you can put English ivy to good use and learn to weave it into a simple Christmas gift basket.

English ivy, or Hedera helix, was introduced as an ornamental garden plant by early European settlers.  It was considered valuable because in its native range, Europe and Asia, it provided food and shelter for a wide range of wildlife, including birds, insects and deer.  Although the local deer do enjoy eating it, English ivy also has a lot of negative consequences for the environment.  It overtakes natural spaces by outcompeting native plants, creating ‘ivy deserts’.

The fibre from English ivy can be used to make rope, baskets, mats and other items.  In this workshop you will learn to split the vines, strip the bark and manipulate the resulting fibre to weave a simple basket that can be put to a variety of uses.  If time and interest permit at the end of the session, participants will head to Larwood Creek tributary to practice clean harvesting – collecting the raw materials without spreading the plant further nor causing sediment to enter nearby streams.

The “Weaving with Ivy” workshop will take place November 28 from 9:30am to 12:30pm at the Sybil Andrews Cottage located at 2131 South Island Highway.  Registration can be done through the Museum at Campbell River 250-287-3103. The cost is $25 per person and all of the weaving materials are included.  Participants must bring a pocket knife, garden shears, and gardening gloves.  Register early as space is limited!