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Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

Invasive Species Research Conference

Turning Science into Action! Co-hosted by Thompson Rivers University and the Invasive Species Council of BC. learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Aquatics

Invasive species are threatening BC’s aquatic and riparian ecosystems, such as streams, lakes, and wetlands, and the species that rely on them. They spread alarmingly fast between waterbodies and can create lasting ecological and economic damage, especially to the recreational areas that we enjoy.

How do aquatic invasive plants spread?

Water-based recreation activities, like angling, boating, diving, and hunting, can spread aquatic invasive species to new locations. Plants, animals, and microscopic creatures can cling to clothing, equipment, and boats. If our gear, clothing, and boats are not cleaned before entering or leaving an area, these species can be introduced into new bodies of water. In addition, the intentional or accidental release of these species from garden ponds and aquariums is a primary pathway of introduction.

Think ahead when planning an outing on the water. Ask yourself:

  1. When entering and departing the water, is my boat, trailer, and other equipment clean of aquatic debris?
  2. What are the local aquatic invasive plants I should be aware of?
  3. If I spot an aquatic invasive plant, do I know who to alert?

What can we do? Prevention is best!

Overall, being aware of aquatic invasive plants and how to prevent their spread are the most effective actions you can take! Thank you for considering the following prevention steps to protect our waters: 

Water Recreation: “CLEAN-DRAIN-DRY” all equipment, boats, motor, trailer, bait buckets, and pets of aquatic debris before leaving. Never transport plants, sediment, or live bait among bodies of water. 

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE CLEAN-DRAIN-DRY PROGRAM

Aquariums/Ponds: Check that species are not invasive before acquiring or sharing them. Drain aquarium water on dry land. Never release or flush unwanted aquarium/pond species or water into natural waters, drainage ditches, or sewers.

Disposal: Dry out, bag and landfill, or incinerate. Control established plants using site- and species- appropriate methods—hand pulling, digging, cutting, and mowing.

Keep an eye open and report these Aquatic Invasive Species: Eurasian Watermilfoil, Parrotfeather, Didymo, Zebra and Quagga Mussels, Common Carp, and Smallmouth and Largemouth Bass.

REPORT Aquatic Invasives:

Resources

T.I.P.S.: Aquariums and Water Gardens discusses how the intentional or accidental release of aquatic invasive plants from aquariums and water gardens into BC's natural waterbodies is a primary pathway of introduction. Aquarium hobbyists, pond owners, pet store owners and customers, and water landscapers can help prevent their establishment by making informed choices when selecting, trading, purchasing, or disposing of aquatic plants.

T.I.P.S.: Water-based Recreation provides a summary of best management practices designed to assist boaters, anglers, and hunters in preventing the spread of "unwanted" aquatic invasive species. Plants, animals, and microscopic creatures can cling to clothing, equipment, and boats. If not cleaned, these species can be introduced into new bodies of water, and can cause significant damage to existing ecosystems.

Visit the Online Store for floating Key Tags, Aquatics Carabiners, and more!

Background

ISC Directors, members, and others have identified aquatic invasive plants awareness as a priority for coordinated action in BC. Based on this direction, the ISC struck an Aquatic Plants Advisory Committee in 2009 to collaboratively develop the Aquatic Invasive Plants Action Plan. Key projects in recent years include the development of two Activities T.I.P.S., floating key tags, and waterproof Aquatics carabiners (as described above). Thank you to the Aquatic Plants Advisory Committee for your expert guidance!