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Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes learn more »

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Gorse

Species
Ulex europaeus

Gorse (Ulex europaeus) is a spiny, perennial evergreen shrub, considered noxious under the BC Weed Control Act, and thrives on sunny clearings with dry, infertile soil such as sandy or rocky areas, roadsides, fields and pastures, bluffs, cutblocks, and cutbanks. It is currently distributed in Vancouver Island, West Vancouver, some of the Gulf Islands, and Skidegate on the Queen Charlotte Islands.

Gorse is a dense evergreen shrub with a single upright stem, spine-like leaves, and fragrant yellow, pea-like flowers. Seedpods are hairy and black. Gorse can grow 1-3 metres in height at maturity.

Growing rapidly for the first 15 years, gorse can live up to 45 years. Maturing seedpods explode and disperse up to 18,000 seeds per mature plant. Gorse seeds are easily distributed by ants, animals, birds, and machinery. Since gorse grows mainly by the ocean, water is a common carrier for seeds. Dense patches can hinder re-vegetation of harvested areas and recreational use of land. Gorse can also increase fire hazard as plants contain volatile oils and produce large amounts of litter. Gorse displaces native vegetation, thereby decreasing forage for wildlife and local plant biodiversity.

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Gallery: Gorse