Enter your short video to win!

Click to read more and enter! learn more »

Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes learn more »

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Common Tansy

Species
Tanacetum vulgare

Common tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) is a perennial and considered regionally noxious under the BC Weed Control Act. Common tansy is currently distributed in the following areas: Bulkley-Nechako, Central Kootenay, Columbia-Shuswap, East Kootenay, and North Okanagan Regional Districts, and within Greater Vancouver, Fraser Valley, southeast coast of Vancouver Island, Gulf Islands, Sunshine Coast, and Squamish/Pemberton.

Common tansy has yellow disc flowers that resemble buttons in a flat-topped cluster at the top of the plant. With fern-like leaves, common tansy can grow 0.4–1.5 metres in height at maturity.

Spread mainly through seeds and roots, common tansy can be transported by birds, animals, and on vehicles that have been in infested areas. Seeds can remain viable for up to 25 years; therefore, stopping seed spread is a main concern. Common tansy prefers sunny areas with well-drained soil, and often infests stream banks, pastures, and disturbed sites such as roadsides. Infestations may be toxic to livestock and to humans if large quantities are consumed.

A few native and ornamental alternatives to plant instead of common tansy include: Yarrow; Tall Coneflower; Summer Sunflower; Morden Eldorado Garden Mum; and Flat-top Goldentop. Read more about these alternatives in the Grow Me Instead booklet for BC.

TIPS Factsheets

Gallery: Common Tansy