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Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

Invasive Species Research Conference

Turning Science into Action! Co-hosted by Thompson Rivers University and the Invasive Species Council of BC. learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Blueweed

Species
Echium vulgare

Blueweed (Echium vulgare) is a biennial to short-lived perennial, and considered regionally noxious under the BC Weed Control Act. Blueweed is commonly found on roadsides, drainage ditches, rights-of-way, fence lines, pastures, rangeland, and other disturbed areas. It is a concern in the Cariboo, Central Kootenay, Columbia-Shuswap, East Kootenay, Okanagan-Silmilkameem, and Thompson-Nicola Regional Districts.

Blueweed has bright blue blossoms found on the upper side of short, rough stems, and grow 30-80 centimetres in height at maturity. Hairy stems are painful to the touch, and hairs often have swollen dark bases that form noticeable flecks. Leaves become progressively smaller as they approach the top of the plant.

Blueweed reproduces up to 2800 seeds per plant. Seeds are generally dropped in the immediate vicinity of the parent plant, but can be distributed further by animals as the rough seeds stick to clothing, hair and feathers. Blueweed invades pastures and rangelands; thus, infestations are associated with some economic losses.

A few native and ornamental alternatives to plant instead of blueweed include: Large-leaved Lupine; Blue Hyssop; Woodland Sage; Penstemon; and Larkspur. Read more about these alternatives in the Grow Me Instead booklet for BC.

TIPS Factsheets

Gallery: Blueweed