We need your input

Help us review the last five years and plan for the future! learn more »

Invasive Species Research Conference

Turning Science into Action! Co-hosted by Thompson Rivers University and the Invasive Species Council of BC. learn more »

Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

We need your input

Help us review the last five years and plan for the future! learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Baby’s Breath

Species
Gypsophila paniculata

Baby’s breath (Gypsophila paniculata) is a herbaceous perennial plant that invades grazing land and out-competes native and introduced perennial grasses. Plants flourish in the well-drained sandy or gravelly soils of vacant lots and along fencelines, establishing unsightly infestations. Baby's breath that mixes with hay reduces the protein value of the crop, making it less valuable for livestock and wildlife forage.  

Though considered unsightly as an escape ornamental, the delicate white or pink blooms and bushy stalks of baby's breath are used extensively in the floral industry for dried and fresh flower arrangements. Seeds often continue to develop in floral arrangements, allowing easy spread. A single plant can produce more than 10,000 seeds that can travel long distances when a complete stalk rolls freely like a tumbleweed. 

A few native and ornamental alternatives to plant instead of baby's breath include: Pearly Everlasting; Filigran Russian Sage; Hewitt’s Double Meadow Rue; Sea Lavender; and White Flax. Read more about these alternatives in the Grow Me Instead booklet for BC.

Gallery: Baby’s Breath