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Parrot's Feather

A popular aquatic garden plant that spreads with water currents, animals, boats/trailers and fishing gear. Dense stands can stagnate water, and increase breeding grounds for mosquitoes learn more »

Zebra/Quagga Mussels

These tiny freshwater mussels clog drains, damage infrastructure, and are very costly to control/eradicate learn more »

Giant Hogweed

A towering toxic invasive plant with WorkSafe BC regulations learn more »

European Fire Ant

A tiny ant with a toxic sting learn more »

Purple Loosestrife

An aggressive wetland invader that threatens plant and animal diversity learn more »

Orange Hawkweed

Also yellow, these invasive plants replace native vegetation along roadsides, and threaten areas not yet reforested learn more »

Japanese Knotweed

Grows aggressively through concrete, impacting roads and house foundations learn more »

Spotted Knapweed

A single plant spreads rapidly with up to 140,000 seeds per square metre learn more »

Scotch Broom

An evergreen shrub that invades rangelands, replaces forage plants, causes allergies in people, and is a serious competitor to conifer seedlings learn more »

Northern Pike

Northern pike can be found throughout most of BC, and is known as a commercial and sport fish, and in some areas an invasive species. The territorial nature of this species makes it a dominant predator in the lakes and rivers it inhabits. Typically, northern pike will eat whatever is available—including fish, amphibians, mice, and small waterfowl—and is the reason some areas consider this species an invasive. What can you do? Although this species is not invasive throughout BC, it is illegal to transport them from one water body to another. If this species has been found in a new location, please report it to your local invasive species committee or directly to BC's DFO office.  

Gallery: Northern Pike